Important Announcement from the Evolution Aircraft Company

Evolution Customer Update October 5th, 2017
As you all can imagine from my first message, the past 48 hours have been pretty all-consuming. We have completed the first phase of our restructure and are now developing the specific needs and processes to move forward.
Company update:
Tuesday afternoon October 3, 2017, we had to lay-off 22 full-time employees out of 49 total.
At present, our focus is on fulfilling all current orders, primarily in the avionics portion of the business. We also have three complete Turbine Evolution kits on hand and they are certainly for sale! These kits will be sold to new customers only with their explicit understanding that as we work through our current situation to deliver all outstanding orders, we will be working just as hard to restructure successfully for the long term. The longer term plan, at this time, is just less certain.
Up until recently, I believed the improvements we have achieved in both the product and the marketing were enough to keep us going. However, several recent incidents out of our control created a bit of a crisis for our company. These include the market for aircraft insurance and delays in deliveries of some redesigned high value-added components. This caused me to question our ability to sustain the sales volume necessary to support us for the long-term with recent staff size.
In addition, we had two customers late in the kit manufacturing process withdraw from their purchase for personal reasons after their kits were almost complete. This put us in the unfortunate position that we had to change our short-term direction immediately to ensure we are able to fulfill all of our commitments to our valued customers whose airframe kits have been fully completed and delivered but whose avionics panels and engine firewall forward packages are still in production.
Rather than expend all our resources hoping sales will come in time, we decided the best course of action was to “right-size” our workforce to what is needed to complete the work we already have until I can secure adequate investment to move forward. As you might imagine, I have been and am continuing to work with a number of investors to re-capitalize the business. To that end, any of you that might know someone who is seriously interested in discussing this opportunity with me please let me know.
Our management team:
I have re-assumed the role of President/CEO, Randy Akacich will remain CFO through this transition, and Tom Pecharich has agreed to take over as General Manager of our retained staff since the work remaining is mostly in our avionics department. Kevin Eldredge has gracefully resigned as President but more importantly has agreed to help where he can to make sure our current customers get what they need to complete their projects and assist me in structuring a successful path forward.
Tasks ahead:
One of our biggest tasks will be supporting the current fleet with parts and technical support. The good news is that the business has no bank debt and all assets have been secured and are available as needed. However, the short term issue I see is responding timely to the needs of our existing customers currently flying. At this point, there will be no one to accept direct phone calls and any messages left will be logged and sorted to be returned as quickly as possible.
I ask that if you all email your questions and needs first to info@evolutionaircraft.com with as much description as possible, we will let you know the email was received and do our very best to support you and give you guidance.
In sum:
I sincerely apologize for the anxiety and inconvenience this may cause but rest assured I am doing all I can to figure out the best plan for the company going forward. The Evolution and the capabilities of the knowledge developed over the past 35 years continue to have great potential in the General Aviation market as well as other applications suitable for the Evolution platform.
I will keep all of you regularly updated as we transition through the company’s short-term difficulties and we strive for the ultimate goal of transitioning to a company adequately financed to achieve greater market applications (and profitability) than just general aviation.
Thank you for your patience and continuing to believe in the Evolution and our company,
Bob Wolstenholme
President/CEO
bobw@evolutionaircraft.com

 

Unfortunately many of our well know contacts from the original Lancair days are now without a job.

Great looking pressurised aeroplane.

We have an EVO that should have been on the way to Oz very soon, not sure on progess ATM.

Our Oz Evo flew first flight yesterday. All good so it should be on the way home soon.

Technology

In the year 2000 this was a state of the art panel.
Whilst it served this owner well it was time for an update.

Wow check this out. Yep the same aeroplane, just 17 years latter, and now state of the art again.                                                                                                                           All new centre stack including the GTN 750. Dual G3X touch and a G5 as backup.
Flew it today and it is absolutely a fabulous and most capable panel.

Complete Avionics on the Goldy have done an exceptional job with a lot of pride taken in doing what they did.

 

 

 

 

 

Are you ready!! An excellent article from LOBO USA


Knowledge is Life
If our most recent study of Lancair accidents tells us anything, it demonstrates that GA pilots—and especially Lancair pilots—need to reexamine our understanding of our aircraft, the environment we fly in and ourselves, with an eye toward raising the bar and furthering our knowledge in all these areas. Do not be content to just kick the tires and light the fires and have a good day of flying. Accept the idea that at any time the engine could quit, the landing gear could remain in the well or the weather could worsen. What are you going to do in that event? I urge you to follow Col. Glenn’s example (and FAR requirements) and know everything necessary to complete the mission safely. Study the POH, review FAA literature, attend FAAST safety seminars and LOBO Landings for more training specific to your operations.
Over twenty years ago I wrote an article about emergency landing procedures which was  published in the American Bonanza Society Magazine. It referenced the Bonanza training guide and T-34B NATOPS Manual for technical details. The article showed how it’s possible to experience an engine failure and glide to a successful landing on a runway or other suitable site within your glide range distance. The Lancair fleet of aircraft have excellent glide characteristics (for example: the IVP has a glide ratio of nearly 20:1 and the Evolution 18:1) IF THE AIRCRAFT IS FLOWN PROPERLY!
Here are a few thoughts to consider when experiencing an engine failure:
1.Remain calm! It does no good to cry like a baby or get old-timer’s syndrome at this moment. At the end of this event your passengers will either believe you were Chuck Yeager with nerves of steel or Bozo the Clown.
2.PERFORM THE IMMEDIATE ACTION CHECKLIST STEPS THAT YOU HAVE COMMITTED TO MEMORY.
3.Maintain control of the aircraft! The aircraft will fly fine without power—it is now a very expensive glider. LOSING CONTROL IS BAD—DO NOT STALL!
4.Maintain altitude if you are above best glide speed (110 KIAS in the Evo or 120 KIAS in the IVP and Legacy or 100Kts for our L320/360) until you reach best glide speed—then maintain best glide speed. This is precious energy do not give it away! Reduce drag—gear up, flaps up, feather the propeller if possible.  If you cannot feather the prop pull the control all the way aft to high pitch (low RPM) position. Keep the gear and flaps up and prop feathered/set to full high pitch until you are ready to land.
5.Turn to nearest airport or other suitable landing site. Assuming you’ve maintained a modicum of situational awareness and know where the hell you are, you should already know where that is. If not, press the NRST button on your GPS. Do not accept ATC vectors away from your chosen landing; the controller is not going to be with you at the landing site.
6.Attempt a restart if you have time and believe the engine might be capable of running. If not secure all fuel sources. Turn off all electrical sources—to eliminate any source of sparks—after putting the gear and flaps down in the pattern.
7.Fly to and arrive overhead the airport, then spiral down in a medium banked turn. Plan to arrive at high and low key positions at the correct airspeed as you were taught.
8.Maintain control of the aircraft! The aircraft will fly fine without power—it is now a very expensive glider. LOSING CONTROL IS BAD—DO NOT STALL!
9.Many engine out approaches end with a stall close to the chosen landing site because the pilot either ran out of energy before the touchdown zone and tried to extend the glide, got too steep in the turn to final and stalled or overshot the landing zone and stalled off the end. The best way to avoid this phenomenon is to practice—a lot!
10.Land smoothly on the runway. Do not expect your significant other to get back in the airplane any time soon if you screw this up.
Except for the engine and propeller comments—the rest is straight out of the glider pilots handbook.
Remember: One day you will be a glider pilot. Are you ready?
For questions and comments on this post contact Jeff via email: j.edwards@lancairowners.com.