Did you know? Service Bulletins

At our Mudgee LOBO Oz Fly-in, one of our attendees drew attention to a couple of Lancair Service Bulletins, and noted that my Legacy had not been modified in accordance with SB023.

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I am not certain how I missed it, and given that this SB was dated 1994, I expected it would have been incorporated into the build book.

Please note that this SB023 is applicable to all Lancair models.

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The forward rivets have now been replaced with pan head screws and nuts as noted in SB023.

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This SB066 is for all of the Lancair IV/ES/and IVPT to ensure the rear access panel on the left side of the rear fuselage is not attached with latches or hinges. The panel is a structural part of the airframe and must be attached using a minimum of -6 screws. Note that new build IVs are now using -8 screws, but there is no requirement to replace existing -6 screws, as used on most of the Lancair IV/ES and IVPT’s that have been flying for some time.

Small things like this is what LOBO Oz is all about.

Learning as a group, we have an amazing pool of expertise and knowledge when it comes to building, flying and maintaining our Lancair aircraft.

Was there something you learnt at our Mudgee fly-in that might need further discussion? Please share.

Bill Harrelson to Speak at LOBO Oz

Bill Harrelson pictured in his Lancair IV after his polar circumnavigation in January 2015. On February 20, 2016 - Bill Harrelson, LOBO Oz member and EAA Lifetime member, who successfully circumnavigated the earth via the polar route earlier this year in his modified Lancair IV N6ZQ, will be the featured guest speaker at the LOBO Oz (Lancair Owners and Builders Organization Australia) fly-in to be held at the NSW Sports Aircraft Club Napper Field airport at Wedderburn over the 19th to 21st February 2016. “Bill Harrelson had a Walter Mitty dream, one of building an airplane in his hangar and flying it around the world in record time,” said LOBO (USA) President Jeff Edwards. “He fulfilled that dream earlier this year while the world watched his adventure unfold on the Internet.” In February 2013 Harrelson concluded a record long-distance flight (7,051 nautical miles) flying N6ZQ nonstop from Guam to Jacksonville, Florida. “Bill’s inspirational efforts in designing, building, and flying the plane highlight the unique capabilities and efficiencies of modern homebuilt aircraft when flown by a true aviator,” Edwards added. Bill and his wife Sue are heading off in their purpose built long range Lancair 1V on a little holiday through the Pacific and eventually to Australia. How good is it to be able to jump into the aircraft you built, a proven long range Lancair of course, and fly it away on holidays to any destination in the world? Bill and Sue are on their third build at the moment, and I am really looking forward to having them entertain us at LOBO Oz fly-in in February. If you would like to learn a little about flying for range and LOP operations, or even flying non-stop for 38 hours, then I could not think of a better person to listen to. Folks, don’t miss this one, as we will put together an interesting programme for the weekend.

Bill Harrelson pictured in his Lancair IV after his polar circumnavigation in January 2015.

On February 20, 2016 – Bill Harrelson, LOBO Oz member and EAA Lifetime member, who successfully circumnavigated the earth via the polar route earlier this year in his modified Lancair IV N6ZQ, will be the featured speaker at the LOBO Oz (Lancair Owners and Builders Organization Australia) fly-in to be held at the NSW Sports Aircraft Club Napper Field airport at Wedderburn over the 19th to 21st February 2016.

“Bill Harrelson had a Walter Mitty dream, one of building an airplane in his hangar and flying it around the world in record time,” said LOBO (USA) President Jeff Edwards. “He fulfilled that dream earlier this year while the world watched his adventure unfold on the Internet.”

In February 2013 Harrelson concluded a record long-distance flight (7,051 nautical miles) flying N6ZQ nonstop from Guam to Jacksonville, Florida. “Bill’s inspirational efforts in designing, building, and flying the plane highlight the unique capabilities and efficiencies of modern homebuilt aircraft when flown by a true aviator,” Edwards added.

Bill and his wife Sue are heading off in their purpose built long range Lancair 1V on a little holiday through the Pacific, and eventually to Australia. How good is it to be able to jump into the aircraft you built, a proven long-range Lancair, of course, and fly it away on holidays to any destination in the world?

Bill and Sue are on their third build at the moment, and I am really looking forward to having them entertain us at LOBO Oz fly-in in February.

If you would like to learn a little about flying for range and LOP operations, or even about flying non-stop for 38 hours, then I could not think of a better person to listen to. Folks, don’t miss this one, as we will put together an interesting program for the weekend.

If you think it is too far to come for a LOBO Oz fly-in, think again – and consider the distance that Bill and Sue will be covering to kindly give their time to our LOBO Oz group. See you then!

To wing cuff, or not to wing cuff…?

wing cuffThat is the question which arises for many Lancair enthusiasts as they make decisions related to the final style and operation of their aircraft.

Indeed, that all new Legacy complete kits can now include the wing cuffs at no charge, indicates a definite interest in this area. As an upgrade, the cuffs cost $1495. And a quick online search also reveals support for this modification.

One of our members, John Smith, has written an article explaining his investigations about wing cuffs, an explanation of what they achieve, and why he elected to include them on his Legacy.

“Before I made a final decision to build a Lancair Legacy, I talked with many people to find out as much as I could about this aircraft. The range of opinions and advice was massive, and without going into all that here, one area that I resolved to research was around systems and passive devices that might help to improve flight safety.

…If you’re not familiar with what a wing cuff is, you might be wondering what all this fuss is about! In a nutshell, a wing cuff is a drooped leading edge section fitted to outboard wing sections covering typically around 30 – 40% of wing span…” John Smith

Discussions on the pros and cons of wing cuffs will probably continue – indeed, it has recently (2013) been discussed on the Lancair mailing list.

Those interested in reading more should access John’s article, Wing Cuffs on the Legacy.

Members might like to add their own experiences in comments here.