See you all next weekend.

The McCraken Country Club has now pretty much locked in our catering requirements, we will be well fed and I look forward to a wonderful weekend. If you are planning to attend and have not yet registered please let me know ASAP.

We have organised some good weather, even though Goolwa is starting to get cooler you can see our arrival day is advertised as being “Mostly sunny and pleasant”.

FAA Issues New AD For TSIO-550 Series

The new AD applies to certain Continental Motors, Inc. including TSIO-550-K, TSIOF-550-K, TSIO-550-C, TSIOF-550-D, and TSIO-550-N reciprocating engines.

Prompted by a report of an un-commanded in-flight engine shutdown, resulting in injuries and significant airplane damage, the AD requires replacing the oil cooler cross fitting assembly. All AD-required action must be completed within 12 months or 100 flight hours after the effective date of Nov 18,2016.

Find the AD here

The FAA on Oct 14, 2016 issued its final rule on Docket No. FAA-2016-0069 which establishes AD 2016-21-04. The new AD applies to certain Continental Motors, Inc. TSIO-550-K, TSIOF-550-K, TSIO-550-C, TSIOF-550-D, and TSIO-550-N reciprocating engines. Prompted by a report of an uncommanded in-flight engine shutdown resulting in injuries and significant airplane damage, the AD requires replacing the oil cooler cross fitting assembly. All AD-required action must be completed within 12 months or 100 flight hours after the effective date of Nov 18,2016. The FAA estimates compliance will cost up to $261 for parts and up to two hours labor per engine.

LOBO Landing Fairhope Alabama

Fairhope was a wonderful venue for the recent LOBO event.  The landing was primarily maintenance related and included a full tour of the nearby Continental Motors factory.

Fairhope was a wonderful venue for the recent LOBO event.
The landing was primarily maintenance related, and included a full tour of the nearby Continental Motors factory. An absolutely fantastic experience to see how our big bore engines are manufactured.

The streets of Fairhope were decorated with "Yarn Bombing"

The streets of Fairhope were decorated with “Yarn Bombing”, in support of the arts in Fairhope.

Very colorful and most unusual but fun.

Very colorful, and most unusual, but fun.

A beautiful Legacy panel Valin and Allyson Thorn took out the Grand Champion Kit Built award at Oshkosh this year. You can see why.....

A beautiful Legacy panel. Valin and Allyson Thorn took out the Grand Champion Kit Built award at Oshkosh this year – you can see why.

Nice finish hey...

Nice finish, hey?

Plenty of eye candy at the LOBO landing.

Plenty of eye candy at the LOBO landing.

It would be wonderful to see an Evolution in Australia. I am still buying lottery tickets.

It would be wonderful to see an Evolution in Australia.
I am still buying lottery tickets.

Transition Training. Member feedback.

Below is a letter from one of our LOBO Oz members.

The Super Legacy.

The Super Legacy.

 

Lancair Super Legacy Training in Tasmania

Have just spent three days exploring the capabilities of the Lancair Super Legacy RG with Gary Weeks and two mates in Devonport.

VH-LNZ is a twin turbo charged Reno Racer version of the Legacy, owned by Terry Travers who imported it from California. We recently joined LOBO Oz and met Gary and his immaculate Legacy at the Mudgee fly-in.

I had only just started flying the Legacy and gained a huge amount of knowledge from the presentations at the fly-in and invaluable advice from Gary Weeks, Gary Burns and many of the other members. They were also extremely supportive and generous with their time in assisting us to prepare for our trip to Warbirds over Wanaka in LNZ.

During all of this communication, we started talking with Gary about the possibility of doing some “transition training” in the Legacy. I had not done any real training other than flying with Terry who had done some training in California before the plane was shipped here.

I had been flying the Legacy very conservatively and well within its limits and my own personal minima’s. So after several weeks of strong westerlies and rain in Tassie, the weather cleared for three beautiful days of clear calm weather for putting the Legacy through its paces.

It is an awesome machine, and Gary opened our eyes to what it is capable of, how it behaves in different scenarios and how to make sure that we stay safe. We are not intending to go anywhere near the limits, but it is important to know where they are, how to recognise them, and what happens if you approach them.

We went through slow speed handling characteristics, stall recognition and recovery, steep turns, glide approaches, emergency gear extensions, engine management, instrument approach configuration, flapless landings, cross wind considerations, go-arounds and so many other helpful tips and advice on all sorts of topics, including Legacy specific maintenance issues, ditching and off-field landings, weight and balance, weather and icing, unusual attitude recovery and performance limitations. All absolutely invaluable knowledge that could one day save your life.

So if you haven’t already done it and you want to extend your knowledge of any Lancair you fly, get in touch with Gary or one of the other committee members and organise some training, or just get actively involved in the group, attend the fly-ins and benefit from the vast amount of experience and knowledge that exists within LOBO.

As a bonus, you will meet some fantastic people that enjoy sharing a common passion.

Thanks Gary for a thoroughly enjoyable and extremely valuable few days sharing your knowledge with us. We are very fortunate to have someone with your passion and expertise in the Lancair community.

Leigh Bryan.

LNZ and ZYA on a crisp Tassie morning in Devonport

LNZ and ZYA on a crisp Tassie morning in Devonport

 

Gary Weeks and the Students – Ian Emmett, Leigh Bryan and Terry Travers

Gary Weeks and the Students – Ian Emmett, Leigh Bryan and Terry Travers

 

 

Did you know? Service Bulletins

At our Mudgee LOBO Oz Fly-in, one of our attendees drew attention to a couple of Lancair Service Bulletins, and noted that my Legacy had not been modified in accordance with SB023.

Capture 23

I am not certain how I missed it, and given that this SB was dated 1994, I expected it would have been incorporated into the build book.

Please note that this SB023 is applicable to all Lancair models.

IMG_0865

 

The forward rivets have now been replaced with pan head screws and nuts as noted in SB023.

Capture 66

This SB066 is for all of the Lancair IV/ES/and IVPT to ensure the rear access panel on the left side of the rear fuselage is not attached with latches or hinges. The panel is a structural part of the airframe and must be attached using a minimum of -6 screws. Note that new build IVs are now using -8 screws, but there is no requirement to replace existing -6 screws, as used on most of the Lancair IV/ES and IVPT’s that have been flying for some time.

Small things like this is what LOBO Oz is all about.

Learning as a group, we have an amazing pool of expertise and knowledge when it comes to building, flying and maintaining our Lancair aircraft.

Was there something you learnt at our Mudgee fly-in that might need further discussion? Please share.

‘the Other Half of Safety’ – from LOBO US

LOBOLogowhite-300x178

Sometimes it’s good not to ‘reinvent the wheel’, so coming across an article on ‘the Other Half of Safety’ on LOBO (US) makes the job of writing this post an easy one.

You may be someone building a Lancair from scratch, or you have purchased a completed project. Or you may even be taking over a build started by someone else. In all cases, consider the following comment from Chris Zavatson:

For many, the kit and the assembly instructions as supplied were by no means optimal for individual purposes, but they provide a baseline that is known to work. 

What makes the experimental plane different from a production aircraft is the ability of the owner/builder to make changes along the way from this baseline. Ideally, these modifications are to enhance the final design and operation of the aircraft.

However, as Chris points out, you need to consider also that, at times, a kit may pass through several hands during the build process:

A new owner might assume the aircraft was built per original plans, and will almost certainly be unable to recognize alterations. In some cases the ‘alterations’ were not even an intentional redesign, but a misalignment, a missing part, or an incorrect bolt. Whatever the cause, deviations have caused damage and loss of life.

In his article, Chris (with considerable experience in inspecting Lancair 320/360s) outlines some of the issues he has uncovered on flying aircraft. He provides an extensive list which you might like to run through, noting items which would be clearly visible on inspection, and others, not so. Ideally, this will highlight some areas you might need to check yourself, or seek advice from someone more expert in the area, even as part of routine maintenance.

Two clear things Chris emphasises are:

  1. the danger and costs of putting things off – i.e. ignoring warning signs
  2. the benefit of education and good maintenance practices.

Keeping both of these in mind, we would also emphasise the need to ask for help and search for information from those more experienced – and again LOBO (US) membership provides great support and knowledge, as we at LOBO OZ aim to do on a local level.

(Access to Chris’ article is open, but there are further members-only areas of support through the LOBO (US) website.)